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200 feared dead in tunnel accident at North Korea nuclear test site

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More than 200 people are feared to have died when a tunnel caved in at North Korea’s nuclear test site after its latest detonation.

A tunnel collapsed at Punggye-ri in early September, days after North Korea conducted its sixth and largest underground nuclear test on September 3, TV Asahi said, quoting unnamed North Korean sources.

Some 100 workers were involved in an initial collapse. Another cave-in occurred during rescue operations, leaving at least 200 people feared dead in total, the Japanese broadcaster said.

The accident was triggered by the test, TV Asahi added.

Experts have warned that the underground tests could cause the mountain to collapse and leak radiation into the atmosphere near China’s border.

The latest test — the sixth at the site since 2006 — triggered landslides in the detonation area and beyond, according to satellite pictures taken the day after.

The images published by the 38 North website showed changes in the surface at Punggye-ri where the ground had been lifted into the air by the tremors. Small landslides followed the course of stream beds.

The blast caused a 6.3-magnitude earthquake, according to the US Geological Survey, followed a few minutes later by another with a magnitude of 4.1.

Japan assessed the yield from the test of what the North said was a hydrogen bomb at 120 kilotons, eight times the size of Hiroshima in 1945.

It is very unusual for North Korea to acknowledge any major accident, especially anything that involves its nuclear programme.

Lee Eugene, a spokeswoman at South Korea’s unification ministry, said: “We are aware of the report but do not know anything about it.”

The report came ahead of US President Donald Trump’s first presidential visit to South Korea next week amid an escalating war of words between him and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un.

The reclusive country has made significant strides in its atomic and missile technology under Kim, who took power after the death of his father and longtime ruler Kim Jong-Il in 2011.

Since then he has overseen four of the country’s six nuclear tests and hailed atomic weapons as a “treasured sword” to protect the nation from invasion by the United States.

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These are the most expensive cars in the world

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For the sake of clarity, we’re categorizing recent production vehicles only and we’re leaving out classic cars sold at auction. We’re also limiting the list to one entrant per nameplate, so don’t expect multiple iterations of the same Bugatti Veyron. And these aren’t necessarily the fastest cars in the world, though, many of them are damn fast.

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So whether your name is Buffett, Gates, Bezos, or McDuck, these rides are for you.

At a glance

Model

Price

 Rolls-Royce Sweptail

 $13 million

 Mercedes-Benz Maybach Exelero

$8 million

 Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita

$4.8 million

 Lamborghini Veneno

$4.5 million

 W Motors Lykan Hypersport

$3.4 million

 Limited Edition Bugatti Veyron by Mansory Vivere

 $3.4 million

Ferrari Pininfarina Sergio

$3 million

 Bugatti Chiron

$2.9 million

Laferrari FXX K

$2.7 million

Aston Martin Valkyrie

$2.6 million

 Pagani Huayra BC

$2.6 million

 Mercedes-AMG Project One

$2.5 million

 Ferrari F60 America

$2.6 million

 Aston Martin Vulcan

$2.3 million

Milan Red

$2.3 million

$13 million — Rolls-Royce Sweptail

$8 million — Mercedes-Benz Maybach Exelero

Adjusted for inflation, the Exelero would cost around $10.1 million in the U.S. today, which is close to the GDP of a small island nation. Money and Maybach are about as closely related as peanut butter and jelly, but the two-door further justifies its cost with a 700 hp, twin-turbo V12 and luxurious amenities.

$4.8 million — Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita

For the Trevita, the Swedish manufacturer developed a new exterior finish called the Koenigsegg Proprietary Diamond Weave, which involves coating carbon fibers with a diamond dust-impregnated resin. We can’t even fathom how much the touch-up paint costs.

Underneath the lustrous finish lies a 4.8-liter, dual-supercharged V8 with a total output of 1,004 horsepower and 797 pound-feet of torque, which means it should have little to no trouble overtaking semis on the freeway.  The car’s specifications — in both performance and price — are nearly comical at this point, and just three were ever made.

$4.5 million — Lamborghini Veneno

The car is absolutely stunning from every angle, and to this day, we’re not convinced it isn’t an alien spacecraft surveying our planet for eventual takeover. It just doesn’t seem real. The only thing more remarkable than the look is the price — a whopping $4.5 million, clearly putting it on our list of the most expensive cars.

The Veneno is fast, and that should come as no surprise. Its 6.5-liter V12 spins all the way up to 8,400 rpm to deliver 740 hp and 507 lb-ft, surging the car to 60 mph in 2.9 seconds.

$3.4 million — W Motors Lykan Hypersport

Let’s start with the styling, which includes jewel-encrusted headlights, scissor doors, and an interior ripped straight from science fiction. It looks like a pissed off armored car from the future, and its performance is right on par with its image. The Hypersport boasts a 3.7-liter, twin-turbo flat-six that yields 770 hp and 708 lb-ft.

It’s not just Dominic Toretto who benefits from this level of performance, though: The Abu Dhabi police force has drafted the Hypersport into patrol duty. Although it’s mainly used for marketing and public relations purposes, the high-flying stunner assures that the authorities can keep up with any baddie who tries to get cute on the freeway. Pedal to the floor, 0 to 62 mph is accomplished in just 2.8 seconds, and top speed is a downright scary 240 mph.

$3.4 million — Limited Edition Bugatti Veyron by Mansory Vivere

Augmented by German witch doctors Mansory, the 1,200-hp Veyron starts out as a Grand Sport Vitesse Roadster, only to be adorned with a gorgeous carbon-fiber body, a new spoiler package, upgraded LED lights, a revamped cabin, and a redesigned front grille. Further classifying the Veyron as a work of art, maps of historic race events like the Targa Florio are laser etched into the exterior and interior. Oh, and it can do 254 mph.

$3 million — Ferrari Pininfarina Sergio

Crafted by legendary Italian design house Pininfarina, the Sergio is essentially a Ferrari 458 Spider with a completely new body and interior. That means a 4.5-liter V8 sends a whopping 562 hp to the rear wheels, but because the Sergio is lighter than the 458, it’s quicker and handles better. The new body doesn’t just save weight — it’s chock-full of interesting details like aerodynamic headrests that are built directly into the roll cage.

With so few examples built, the Sergio’s purchase process wasn’t as simple as strolling up to a Ferrari dealership. No, each owner was chosen by the automaker itself, making it one of the rare invite-only vehicles in automotive history.

$2.9 million — Bugatti Chiron

With a starting price of $2.9 million and a gorgeous new body, the divine Chiron outdoes its predecessor in every conceivable way. While the Bugatti Veyron redefined what an automobile could do, the Chiron laughs at those who said the Veyron was the last of its kind, pushing the boundaries of performance even further into the stratosphere.

The supercar’s monstrous specs are made possible by its reworked quad-turbocharged 8.0-liter W16, which now produces 1,500 hp and a monstrous 1,180 lb-ft. Sixty mph is dealt with in a rather quick 2.5 seconds on the way to the Chiron’s top speed, which is limited to 261 mph. It’s still not the fastest car in the world — that title belongs the Hennessey Venom F5  — but cars like these aren’t just about speed; they’re about making statements. We think you’ll agree this Bugatti makes a very strong statement indeed.

$2.7 million — LaFerrari FXX K

The “standard” car’s output of 950 hp was boosted to a downright silly 1,035 hp in FXX K guise, and its various body modifications have increased downforce by up to 50 percent. Even the tires are space age, as the slick Pirellis feature embedded sensors to keep tabs on longitudinal, lateral, and radial acceleration, as well as temperature and pressure. Until Ferrari invents some sort of road-going hyperdrive, this is about as good as a performance car gets.

$2.6 million (estimated) — Aston Martin Valkyrie

The Valkyrie is the product of a partnership between Aston Martin and the Red Bull Racing Formula One team. The partners hope to achieve a 1:1 power-to-weight ratio, and they are equipping the Valkyrie with a lightweight carbon fiber chassis and 6.5-liter V12 hybrid powertrain to make that happen. The Valkyrie will also produce unprecedented levels of downforce on the track.

Aston plans to build both road-going and track-only versions of the Valkyrie. The track version will be able to keep up with a Le Mans LMP1 race car on the track, Aston boasts. Only 150 Valkyries will be built, including 25 track versions and a handful of prototypes.

$2.6 million — Pagani Huayra BC

Right off the bat, you can tell the BC is playing a different game from the standard Huayra. It’s fitted with an enormous active rear spoiler that generates 1,102 pounds of downforce at 155 mph, as well as a wider rear track, new side skirts, and a bevy of sexy aero goodies. Despite the additions, the BC is a true featherweight, tipping the scales at a paltry 2,654 pounds thanks to the extensive use of carbon fiber and other lightweight materials. The whole deal will cost you a cool $2.6 million (or it would have, if all 20 units hadn’t sold already), but you clearly get a lot for your money. With 789 turbocharged ponies on tap, the BC may actually live up to its godly name.

$2.5 million — Mercedes-AMG Project One

Aerodynamics dictated its low-slung shape. The interior is pretty barren, which you’d expect from this kind of machine. There are two heavily bolstered seats installed close together, a pair of 10-inch screens, and a Formula One-style steering wheel with buttons for things like the driving modes and the suspension settings.

Mercedes-AMG expects to deliver the first examples of the Project One in late 2019. Production is limited to 275 examples and, unsurprisingly, every single example has already been spoken for.

$2.5 million — Ferrari F60 America

The supercar is mechanically identical to the F12, but the Berlinetta isn’t exactly a Fiat Panda to begin with. Its 6.2-liter V12 churns out 740 glorious hp, enough to propel the car to 60 mph in only 3.1 seconds. The ultra rare flag-waver harks back to Ferrari’s bespoke past, as the company built several region-specific sports cars in the 1950s and 1960s.

$2.3 million — Aston Martin Vulcan

The Vulcan may look like a spaceship, but it’s actually a tribute to old-school analog feel. Instead of a high-tech hybrid system, it relies on the pure grunt of a naturally aspirated 7.0-liter V12. That massive engine produces over 800 hp, an output it sends to the rear wheels through a six-speed sequential gearbox.

The car itself is built around a carbon-fiber monocoque, ensuring those 800 horses don’t have much to push around. In fact, Aston claims the Vulcan has a better power-to-weight ratio than some of its race cars. And if that isn’t hardcore enough, Aston required owners to train in a Vantage GT4 racer and a One-77 before stepping into their Vulcans. Now that’s serious performance.

$2.3 million — Milan Red

Named after the Red Kite, a species of bird of prey, the Milan Red is a supercar boasting a $2.3 million price tag and a limited production run of just 99 cars. That small group of customers will get a 6.2-liter quad-turbocharged V8 producing a claimed 1,307 hp and 1,303 lb-ft of torque, plus exterior styling that’s sure to turn heads.

Milan claims the Red will do 0 to 62 mph in 2.47 seconds, and reach a top speed of 249 mph. As with all new boutique automakers, it’s unclear whether Milan actually be able to meet those performance targets, or get its supercar into production at all. But it would be cool to see this new company pull it off.

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here’s how to check your tire pressure

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Ways to check tire pressure

There are various ways to check the tire pressure on your vehicle. If you have a car that was made around or just after 1986, there’s a chance it comes with a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS). Those chances increase as the cars get newer. For instance, the U.S. saw its first TPMS-equipped car in 1991, thanks to General Motors equipping the Chevrolet Corvette with the system. If your car was made after September 2007, your car unquestionably has TPMS, a federal safety mandate for light-duty vehicles (weighing less than 10,000 pounds), imposed through the United States TREAD Act of 2000. It’s a policy enacted following the historic and major Firestone tire recall of the late 1990s that affected Ford Explorer trucks equipped with faulty tires from the factory.

What does TPMS do? It automatically notifies you via a lit dashboard icon if you either have too much or too little air in your tires. Some of the systems are particularly rudimentary, with a single warning light suggesting one or more of the four tires isn’t filled properly. With more recent cars equipped with infotainment systems or trip computers embedded into the gauge cluster, there are more comprehensive TPM systems that tell you the approximate pressure of each tire.

Here are a few examples of TPM systems on newer vehicles:

If your ride doesn’t have a TPM system, or it does but it doesn’t display individual tire pressures, you’ll need to check the tires the old-fashioned way. First, you need to acquire a tire pressure gauge. These can be picked up very easily from places like your local gas station quick-mart, or any local automotive parts or general hardware department store. Most are just a few dollars, but the fancier ones can cost as much as $20 or $30.

These are the two most common types of tire pressure gauges, analog versus digital:

Step 1: Determine your correct tire pressure

Your owner’s manual will tell you the proper tire pressure readings for your vehicle application and associated weight. On most cars, like this 2017 Cadillac ATS-V Coupe, the tire pressure information is printed on a sticker placed on the inner door as well.

how to check your tire pressure 2017  dt photos by chris chin 16

Step 2: Double-check the tire sidewall

Read the tire sidewall and compare the information provided to the figures you got from your owner’s manual. As long as your tires are stock or within stock requirements (custom wheel arrangements notwithstanding), this is where your car’s tire pressure should be.

Step 3: Remove the tire valve stem cover

Access any one of your four tires and remove the tire valve stem cover.

Take your tire pressure gauge, and place it at the tip of the valve stem with the female receiver end of the pressure gauge. Give it a nice push for a couple seconds, and you’ll hear some air hiss out of the stem — no worries, this is completely normal.

Read the numbers, often in pressure-per-square-inch or psi, and compare them with the recommended tire pressure from steps 1 and 2.

Step 6: Rinse, wash, repeat

Repeat this process on every tire, including your spare if you have one, to ensure all the tires on your vehicle are properly pressurized.

Step 7: Fill, if needed

If your tire has too little air in it, which is likely since tires are slightly porous and can lose air in drastic ambient temperature changes, you can top it off using a store-bought air compressor or hand pump. Alternatively, you can pop by your local gas station and use their air pump in exchange for some quarters.

Typically, air pumps at stations have built-in tire pressure gauges to notify you of the pressure reading. Some of them can be worn and thus inaccurate, which is why it’s advised to just buy a tire pressure gauge and keep it in your car at all times.

Notes on nitrogen-filled tires

If your car was at a Costco Tire Center or even a dealership, there are chances your tires were filled with pure nitrogen. The reason for using nitrogen over any plain air is that nitrogen is less volatile of a gas. When plain air heats up, its mass expands and becomes less dense and when it cools down, its mass contracts and becomes more dense, thus affecting the pressurization of a tire. The use of nitrogen would be signified by the use of a green valve stem cap, rather than a normal dark colored one. Although it is advised not to fill nitrogen tires with normal air, there’s no real harm to topping it off if your tire pressure is off by a few psi.

You can get your tires refilled completely with nitrogen. However, average Joe tire shops will charge up to $30 a tire to empty them completely and refill them with nitrogen. Alternatively, you can pop into your local dealership and they might honor a tire refill as part of a customer courtesy. And if you bought your tires at Costco, they offer free nitrogen refills as part of their tire packages for consumers.

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